The Latest

Jun 30, 2014

Haruki Murakami - Kafka on the Shore

“But if something did happen, it happened. Whether it’s right or wrong. I accept everything that happens, and that’s how I became the person I am now.” 
― Haruki Murakami, Kafka on the Shore

Jan 10, 2014 / 1,754 notes

tedx:

Want to be happier with your work in 2014? Take the advice of psychologist Shawn Achor, taken from his TEDxBloomington talk, The happy secret of better work."

Watch the whole talk here»

Jan 8, 2014

some thoughts…

…Complicated ideologies have indeed led us to be living in the world of today. It is therefore the duty of creative individuals and companies to ensure simplicity is projected. Ideas worth spreading, whether business models, consumer trends, products and services - even culture itself - can therefore be digested, embedded and maintained in our brains…. PK 27Jul2013

newyorker:

Matthew Hutson on the link between accomplishment and informality, and the power of the hoodie-wearing C.E.O.: http://nyr.kr/1fWMX9T

Photograph by Justin Sullivan/Getty.
Dec 26, 2013 / 149 notes

newyorker:

Matthew Hutson on the link between accomplishment and informality, and the power of the hoodie-wearing C.E.O.: http://nyr.kr/1fWMX9T

Photograph by Justin Sullivan/Getty.

Dec 26, 2013 / 1 note
newyorker:

Daniel Mendelsohn on myth, Greek tragedy, and the J.F.K. story: http://nyr.kr/18WxDor

“The end of the Iliad is, in other words, a narrative about grief yielding to mourning, about the way in which civilization responds to violence and horror. This dark solace is one that only culture can provide. Our endless need to replay the events of November, 1963—by which I mean all of the events, from Friday to Monday—is not only about a perverse, almost infantile need to revisit a scene of primal horror. It also bears witness to our desire to hear once again a very old tale that is not only the story of a fallen warrior and how he died but the story of what we did after he fell, of how the bloodied body is washed and anointed and clothed and grandly entombed and eulogized.”
Nov 24, 2013 / 976 notes

newyorker:

Daniel Mendelsohn on myth, Greek tragedy, and the J.F.K. story: http://nyr.kr/18WxDor

“The end of the Iliad is, in other words, a narrative about grief yielding to mourning, about the way in which civilization responds to violence and horror. This dark solace is one that only culture can provide. Our endless need to replay the events of November, 1963—by which I mean all of the events, from Friday to Monday—is not only about a perverse, almost infantile need to revisit a scene of primal horror. It also bears witness to our desire to hear once again a very old tale that is not only the story of a fallen warrior and how he died but the story of what we did after he fell, of how the bloodied body is washed and anointed and clothed and grandly entombed and eulogized.”